So confused!!

Discuss about the Residency Match process - applications, interviews, visas, medical school transcripts, residency programs, ECFMG certificate, match strategies and post-match scramble. Meet current Residents & Fellows here and network for Residency placement. Post your opinion on specific residency programs.

So confused!!

Postby nadiranaqvi » 29 May 2005, 02:50

Can anyone explain how the match works to me??!

I'm engaged to New Yorker and so am wanting to move across from the UK. I'm born and bred in the UK and qualified from Medical School in 1999 and have been specializing to become a surgeon since then having just got my MRCS.

I know have to take the USMLEs and start from scratch out there (gutting!) - but I'm not sure about the timing. If I want to start work asap when do need to have completed my Step 1, 2 and 3? And when does the match start and end? When is the earliest time that I can start working?

Would be really grateful for any help!
nadiranaqvi
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 29 May 2005, 02:38

Postby benzie » 30 May 2005, 16:01

Hi

I'm also in the UK and planning to move over there.

Residencies start in the summer, and application deadlines are the preceding autumn, with interviews in November through to January.

You don't NEED to have all the steps in the bag when you submit your application, but as a foreigner this is one way in which you can get ahead (most American students don't have their step 2 CK/CS results at the time of applying, as step 2 is the equivalent of finals). For you, I would strongly get steps 1, 2 and the CS in the bag prior to applying, especially since you're aiming for a very competitive specialty (surgery). People have told me that UK graduates are well-liked in America (not sure how true this is, but we are lucky enough to have English as our first language, so that's something; however, however good you are, always remember that the American students are likely to get preference over you). As for step 3, I've heard that it's worth doing before you apply in some circumstances, like if you have mediocre scores on the other steps. Some states don't like people to do step 3 until during the residency anyway.

Step 1 is the most difficult hurdle if you're a postgraduate, I would say.

Hope this is helpful - let me know if I can be of any more help
benzie
 


Thanks!

Postby nadiranaqvi » 31 May 2005, 01:49

- that's really helpful.

But so that I can plan out when I should take each Step exam, am I right in thinking that I should have the results to my Step 1 and Step 2 CK by Dec 1st this year and ideally have done (although not necessarily have the results of) Step 2 CS by that time too, so that I can be in good stead to apply for a residency in surgery via the Match at that point?

Also am I right in thinking that by March of next year the process would be complete and I should know where I'd be working (hopefully, theoretically at least!), and this would actually commence in June 2005?
nadiranaqvi
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 29 May 2005, 02:38

replying

Postby benzie » 31 May 2005, 14:24

You're cutting it fine but it is do-able. If you think that you can get the necessary preparation done before mid october (in order to get the result by december 1st), go for it. Remember that you're going need very high scores and a strong CV to get into NYC surgical programmes. You might be better off taking more time over the exams, getting all your results in, chilling some, and going for the 2007 match instead (which, incidentally, is what I'm doing).
benzie
 

Postby nadiranaqvi » 01 Jun 2005, 11:26

Cool! That's made things a lot clearer. Not sure what I'll do - but when I figure it out and no doubt will need more matters sorted out, I'll definitely get back here!
nadiranaqvi
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 29 May 2005, 02:38

Books for Step 1 & 2???

Postby nadiranaqvi » 21 Jun 2005, 06:56

This may seem like a silly question - but which books should I get for Step 1 and 2? I need like 1 decent book for each Step to read cover to cover shiftly and then refer to and then loads of MCQ Q&A books (I learn best from making mistakes!) as practice - but there are so many and not knowing many people who have done the exam, not sure which ones are any good. Anyone help?
nadiranaqvi
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 29 May 2005, 02:38

Postby DrJeff » 26 Jul 2005, 22:31

As for your ability to get a surgery program in NY as a UK trained doc. Assuming you are born and raised in the UK you will have little trouble getting a residency. Canadians are not considered FMGs and UK is second only to that. The programs will consider you above folks from other countries and often over the US citizens graduating from the caribbean schools.
DrJeff
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 26 Jul 2005, 15:05
Location: Texas

Oh cool!

Postby nadiranaqvi » 27 Jul 2005, 09:08

That is reassuring! Just have to make sure I do well in these exams first and foremost I guess (tips/advice/hints etc very welcome!)

You don't know anything regarding visa's though?
I mean I'm engaged to a New Yorker hence the move across the water, but ideally don't want to be enforced by the fiancee visa rulings to have to get married within 3 months of entering the country (I want the wedding of the year which requires planning you understand!!), - so is there any other way? Or would my chances or landing a decent residency be optimised by going down that road?
nadiranaqvi
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 29 May 2005, 02:38

Postby DrJeff » 27 Jul 2005, 20:59

If you are committed and planning to get married anyway, I would say slip away to the Judge or justice of the peace, have a quick and very cursory legal cerimony in the the eyes of the state. If you prefer, do like my wife and I did and just never tell anyone else, and get married in a year or so.
DrJeff
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 26 Jul 2005, 15:05
Location: Texas

Postby nadiranaqvi » 28 Jul 2005, 06:43

So will me being already being married to my fiance, who is American, stand me in better stead for getting a good residency when applying? Or is it more that getting a visa to work in the US by an alternative route is a real hassle?
nadiranaqvi
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 29 May 2005, 02:38

Postby DrJeff » 28 Jul 2005, 06:54

I am up to date on visa issues. However, I was recently a chief resident and if you told me that you were recently UK trained, and came to the US because you were recently married, I would see you as equal if not a little more interesting.

We rank applicants as one of three catagories. Most FMGs are in the last category. You would be the exception who would certainly be in the middle category and I would likely vote to put you in the top category.
DrJeff
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 26 Jul 2005, 15:05
Location: Texas

Postby DrJeff » 28 Jul 2005, 06:56

sorry....typo. I meant "I am NOT up to date on Visa issues but..."
DrJeff
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 26 Jul 2005, 15:05
Location: Texas

Postby nadiranaqvi » 29 Jul 2005, 09:49

Oh okay - thanks for that!

Do you mind if I just pick your brain some more though?!! I'm not particularly au fait with the American training system, with regard to General Surgery in particular. I was wondering if you might be able to give me the heads up on the matter. What are the different stages you have to go through and how many years at each level. Also, what exams do you have to take in order to progress and when can you take them?

And another thing (!), given I've got my MRCS (the post graduate specialization exams, that one takes here in England, in order to become surgeon), would it be possible for me to be fast tracked at all do you know?
nadiranaqvi
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 29 May 2005, 02:38

Postby DrJeff » 30 Jul 2005, 20:32

Last things first. The US will seldom give credit for anything other than medical school. General surgery is where most go and it last 5 years after med school. Specialization in plastics, thoracic a few after that. I am not a surgeon so cant remember specifics. Testing is USMLE1, USMLE, csa. Sometime during residency take USMLE3. After residency when you have a job and working take the Board Cert in Surgery...yes you can work and practice without being board cert but it really limits things greatly. In residency, most programs take a yearly written exam that doesnt officially count but the program may use your scores to punish...I mean further train you..
DrJeff
0 Star Member
0 Star Member
 
Posts: 0
Joined: 26 Jul 2005, 15:05
Location: Texas

Next

Return to Residency Matching - NRMP, ERAS & IMG Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron